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ICT for Development

Connecting ICTs to Development
Date:
22 May 2014

Connecting ICTs to Development[2013] This publication presents a comprehensive analysis of the key findings and lessons learned from IDRC experience with information and communication technology for development (ICT4D).

The book is structured around four thematic areas: 
 - Introduction to ICT4D at IDRC 
 - Catalysing access to ICTs
 - Sectoral application of ICTs
 - ICT4D in research

ICT4D Effects: Youth, ICTs and Agriculture
Date:
22 May 2014

Youth ICTs and Agriculture

[2013] This IICD publication is informed by the findings from recent research focused on three projects under the Connect4Change (C4C) Economic Development programme. The projects were located in western Kenya and focused on enhancing agricultural productivity and access to markets.

The research investigated the linkages between the introduction and use of ICT in farming, and the interest of youth in farming and value chain development.

 

Social Media Handbook for Agricultural Development Practitioners
Date:
22 May 2014

Social Media Handbook[2013] The Social Media Handbook for Agricultural Development Practitioners is designed to help USAID projects and other implementing organizations use social media to complement their existing and future agricultural communications efforts. In addition, it aims to provide practitioners with a foundational understanding of what is needed to create compelling social media content.

 
ICT for Rural Economic Development: 5 years of Learning
Date:
04 June 2014
ict iicd[2012] Rural economic development has been a priority within IICD’s strategy since IICD was first established 15 years ago. During the past five years, 35 projects have been supported in nine countries as part of IICD’s overarching programme to promote socio-economic development through increased ICT access and use. This publication gives an overview of the lessons learned and examples of IICD's work in ICT for rural economic development.

Individuals, families, communities, organisations and sectors can all benefit from accessing relevant information and communication tools. The experiences of partners demonstrate that the multiplicity of effects and lessons can be better grasped when they are looked at from the individual, organisational and sector level.



Forging Innovations: Community Multimedia Centres in Nepal
Date:
04 June 2014
cmcsnepal[2007] This collection of case studies intends to showcase the diverse growth of three Community Multimedia Centres (CMCs) supported by Unesco in Nepal since 2003, in an effort to understand their social impact. 

The case studies show how local communities accessed and utilised newly available ICT tools in different ways. The authors carried out field visits to interview managers, staff, local researchers, community reporters, volunteers and community people. This allowed to identify some key issues which can assist in providing ICT access to poor and marginalised communities in Nepal.
Mobile Technology in Emergencies
Date:
05 June 2014
Mobile[2012] Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, has described the mobile phone as the “single most transformative tool for development”. This publication by Save the Children and the Vodafone Foundation explores how to overcome obstacles to the effective use of mobile phone technology in emergency response, in relation to distribution of cash to support food security and livelihoods, information sharing, two-way communication with affected communities, and other potential integrated services.

The report draws on interviews with emergency response staff in six countries to argue that, in order to realise the potential of mobile phones in emergency response, emphasis should go on: increasing accountability, building preparedness and prioritising collaboration. It also provides recommendations for the humanitarian sector to realise the transformative potential of mobile phones more fully.
ICTs and Large-Scale Poverty Reduction. Lessons from Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean
Date:
04 June 2014

deza-icts[2005] Hundreds of initiatives, projects and programmes around the globe are using ICT to help the up-scaling of poverty reduction efforts. But changes in technology and approaches happen extremely rapidly and it is difficult to condense common lessons.

This publication edited by the Swiss Development Cooperation and PANOS compiles state-of-the-art lessons on the topic of ICTs for poverty reduction, in different regions of the world. These discussion papers and lessons have been derived from various events and processes connected to the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) of Tunis, November 16–18, 2005.

Web 2.0 and Social Media for Development
Date:
23 May 2014


imark[2011] This module is part of the Information Management Resource Kit (IMARK) developed by FAO in collaboration with the Joint Donors’ Competence Development Network (Train4Dev). It is a distance learning for agricultural information management offered free of charge on the Internet or on CD-ROM.

The module illustrates the basic concepts related to Web 2.0, social media, social networking and user generated content and describes their strategic value for an organization. It describes how social media tools can be used strategically to more effectively collaborate and exchange knowledge in the context of rural and agricultural development. Learners can consult a glossary specific to the module, a printable version of each lesson is also provided.

This module is available in English, Spanish and French.

From Need to Sustainability: Empowering People to Use ICT for their Development
Date:
05 June 2014
iicdapproach[2013] IICD has more than 15 years of experience using a distinctive participatory and multi-stakeholder approach to ICT for Development (ICT4D). Whereas many ICT4D projects focus on the transfer of new or innovative technologies, IICD focuses on the people facilitating a process in which stakeholders co-create and implement their own ICT solutions. Core principles of this approach include: learning by doing, gender sensitivity, knowledge sharing.

This document provides a summary of IICD approach towards ICT for development which consists of six phases that are collectively called a ‘social innovation process’. The six phases are: (1) needs assessment, (2) project formulation, (3) implementation and pilots, (4) embedding, (5) scaling up and (6) systemic change.
ICT-Led Social Innovation Process
Date:
05 June 2014

ict-led innovations[2011] This report summarises feedback, evaluation and lessons learned when designing ICT for development programmes.

The ICT-based Social Innovation Process enables diverse stakeholders to set priorities for strengthening the sectors they have an interest in, shape their sector’s development path, and design how their organisations will use ICT tools to empower their staff and their beneficiaries to create positive change. From its inception, IICD has thus always regarded ICT as tools whose power can be harnessed by people in developing countries to shape their own development rather than technology being a goal.



Information and Communication for Development 2012: Maximizing Mobile
Date:
05 June 2014
ic4dmobile[2012] Developing countries are increasingly well placed to exploit the benefits of mobile communications, with levels of access rising around the world. This report analyzes the growth and evolution of applications for mobile phones, focusing on their use in agriculture, health and financial services, as well as their impact on employment and government. The emphasis is no longer on the phone itself, but on how it is used, and the content and applications that mobile phones open in development.

In particular Chapter 2 examines the emerging uses of mobile services in agriculture, as well as remote and satellite technologies that are assisting in food traceability, sensory detection, and status updates from the field.
ICT Enabled Development: Using ICT Strategically
Date:
05 June 2014
ict enabled[2010] This report was developed by Plan Finland to support country offices in Africa to apply ICTs more strategically and effectively to development goals.

The first section explains the concept of ICT-enabled development, and the reasons why it is important for development organisations to take it on board. With many ICT tools and applications available, the job of a development organisation is no longer to compensate for lack of access but to find innovative and effective ways of putting the tools to development ends.

A checklist for planning strategic use of ICTs suggests some key steps for the design process, and some questions to ask in order to ensure appropriate and workable plans ensuring that ICT use is both linked to real development needs and priorities, and appropriate to the target group. The report also provides examples (of both methodologies and experiences) to orient participatory assessment and planning ICT for development processes. Plan’s current development work with ICT in Africa is included as additional material.
Information and Communication Technologies for Development
Date:
05 June 2014
iiedicts[2012] This paper asks “How is information and communication technology (ICT) being used in agricultural development?” It provides a snapshot of the types of ICT solutions that are emerging in agriculture for development and how these solutions are beginning to be used to fight hunger, reduce poverty, raise education, protect our environment and improve our health, all things we need to do in order to build a smarter global community.

Using case study examples, the paper outlines how ICT applications for the agriculture sector range from the highly sophisticated, fully-integrated chain-wide agri-business service packages used by the most commercial farmers, down to basic voice and text messaging that is being used very effectively by less resourced smallholder farmers and traders. To take advantage of this marketplace, the private sector, NGOs and governments are investing in a range of new tools to link farmers with assets, services and markets.
Mobiles for Development
Date:
05 June 2014
mobiles4dev[2010] Mobiles4Dev is a research study commissioned by UNICEF to help understand the global mobile telephony landscape as it relates to advancing development, and as an area of significant future opportunities.

The report gives an overview of the impact of mobiles on socio-economic development and how they can facilitate equity-based programming. It also highlights key trends in the sector, including mobile telephone and Internet usage, and common themes in mobile operators’ business strategy and corporate social responsibility.

Evidence from 14 country studies (Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana, Iraq, Kosovo, Lao PDR, Malawi, Mongolia, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Uganda, Zambia) suggest that mobile tools can provide cost effective interventions, overcome bottlenecks to services, and enable communities to maximize the impact of available resources.
Deepening Participation and Improving Aid Effectiveness through Media and ICTs
Date:
05 June 2014
Participation Media ICTs[2007] After more than ten years of support for a people-­centered approach to embedding modern ICTs within Poverty Alleviation Pro­grams, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) has reviewed project reports, study program evaluations and meta-evaluations, in order to distil lessons learned on how ICTs can really help to improve development cooperation programmes and more particularly to enhance voice and accountability programs.
ICTs for Poverty Reduction? Discussion Paper
Date:
05 June 2014

icts poverty reduction[2003] Poverty is seen as the opposite of well-being. Beyond a lack of income, the multidimensional concept of poverty also refers to disadvantages in access to land, credit and services (e.g. health and education), vulnerability (towards violence, external economic shocks, natural disasters), powerlessness and social exclusion.

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) facilitate the creation, storage, management and dissemination of information by electronic means. This definition includes radio, television, elephone, fax, computer and the Internet. ICT applications in developing countries are often part of an overall strategy for economic growth, relying on the trickle down effect to those in poverty. The limitations of this approach are well known. Effective poverty reduction requires a more targeted approach.

 
 
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